For the month of October, It Still Lives is bringing you spooky tales of the supernatural from right here in Rabun County, Georgia. Join us each week from now until October 29th for tales about witches, haints, and jack-o-lanterns! This week features an excerpt from storyteller Don Patterson of Hiawassee, Georgia.

For the month of October, It Still Lives is bringing you spooky tales of the supernatural from right here in Rabun County, Georgia. Join us each week from now until October 29th for tales about witches, haints, and jack-o-lanterns! This week features an excerpt from storyteller Don Patterson of Hiawassee, Georgia.

This month we sit down with PhD candidate and climate researcher Dylan Harris. Dylan joined us at the end of August to host a storytelling and climate conference at Foxfire. This event explored climate-based narratives, and drew on the experiences of climate researchers, geographers, and storytellers from Appalachia and Alaska.

This episode is a recap of Executive Director and podcast co-host TJ Smith's recent trip to China. Sponsored by the American Folklore Society, TJ had the opportunity to spend 10 days exploring folkways in Guangzhou as a representative of Foxfire. 

This month’s episode features interviews on curing and smoking meat–and how climate change has impacted this important part of Southern Appalachian foodways. This episode includes interview excerpts from Foxfire contacts Buck Carver, Sallie Beaty, J.C. Stubblefield, Carl Rogers, and Icie Rickman.

This episode features special hosts, two local high school students participating in the summer Foxfire Fellowship. The fellows this summer decided to create an episode on the movie Deliverance (1972) which was filmed in Rabun County. Their inspiration for this episode came from the recent filming of Netflix's Hillbilly Elegy, also in Rabun County, based on J.D. Vance's best-selling novel. 

Hosts Kami Ahrens and TJ Smith indulge in their love of cast iron and wood stove cooking! Featuring interviews from Addie Norton, Lola Cannon, Bessie Underwood, and Sharon Stiles, this episode looks at cooking before electricity and gas and introduces you to the upcoming revised edition of the Foxfire Book of Appalachian Cookery.

 

Hosts Kami Ahrens and TJ Smith introduce you to Aunt Arie Carpenter, one of Foxfire's most visited contacts. This episode features clips from the first recorded interview at Arie's house in North Carolina. During the three-hour-long interview, Aunt Arie covered topics ranging from souse meat, hard times, and land development.

Hosts Kami Ahrens and TJ Smith revisit the 1980 "It Still Lives" album. This week we take a look at some of the musical recordings from the album. We discuss the origins of "mountain" instruments - banjos, fiddles, and mountain dulcimers - and how they were used in mountain communities. 

Hosts Kami Ahrens and TJ Smith take you on a journey through Southern Appalachia heritage using stories, songs, and more from the Foxfire archives. This pilot episode explores storytelling and the role of folklore in the mountains. Featuring storyteller and musician Stanley Hicks, we talk animals and legends and whether or not the 'stinger snake' really exists!

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